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Issue Paper / Spring 2016 Canada’s Urban Forests in a Changing Climate

The first of this year focuses on the impact of climate change on our metropolitan forests. IP#6-Spring2016, authored by one of our distinguished members, Dr. Steve Colombo, addresses a range of interrelated issues including threats from invasive species, the value trees have on air quality and human health, and sustainable management practices.

Issue Paper / Winter 2015 Northern Reflections: Climate Change and Infrastructure in Canada’s North

This Issue Paper was written by Forum Directors Jim Abraham and Ian Church and Risk Sciences International Director Erik Sparling. They begin by outlining climate risks and impacts particular to the North, related to loss of sea ice, thawing permafrost, and increasing temperatures. They discuss the advances in adaptation policies at all levels of government in addition to industry, as well as the progress made in research and monitoring in the last decade. Finally, they propose additional advancements and initiatives required to ensure Canada’s North becomes truly resilient to future climate change.

Issue Paper / Fall 2015 Canadian Forest Products: Contributing to Climate Change Solutions

Our fall 2015 Issue Paper was written by Forum scientist and member, Dr. Steve Colombo. He elaborates on how Canada’s forests can play a key role in helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limiting the effects of the projected 2 degree Celsius global temperature increase. He outlines the climate change effects currently affecting forests and proposes adaptation strategies.

Issue Paper / Spring 2015 The Impact of Climate on Canadian Municipalities and Infrastructure

Written by Forum Director and Meteorologist Jim Abraham

Issue Paper / Fall 2014 Forecasting a Sea of Change: Lessons from Atlantic Canada

Written by the Canadian Climate Forum (also available in French).


Symposium 2014 Full Report / Extreme Weather: Impacts, Challenges and Adaptations

In 2013, Canada had several bouts of extreme weather, which caused social and economic disruption. The severity of such events is increasing. Read more at Extreme Weather.